Radfield Homecare

The carer’s role

Values are everything to us at Radfield and we only select the most responsible carers who can both uphold our values and demonstrate their personality fit to our family culture. We can support and train people to be great Radfield carers but we can’t train someone to be a great person with the right attitude.

When a new carer begins to work at Radfield, they are carefully monitored and trained by our experienced care team. As well as learning the practical skills, we also monitor how well they interact with clients and if they form positive relationships with them.

We support our carers with ongoing feedback and training, and encourage them to progress into structured learning such as, undertaking diplomas in social care or progression to management level.

We are proud to have a high staff retention rate at 89%, whereas the industry standard is 30%. We consider this a reflection of how much we value our care staff and how we respect the work they do. Many staff members have remained with us from when we started in 2008.

Care Certificate Training

All staff working in Health and Social Care should complete the national entry level qualification but it is not obligatory. At Radfield, we ensure with our training that all of our carers exceed the standards outlined in the certificate.

All Radfield carers undergo training to meet our standards in the following areas:

Theoretical learning: 

Practical training covers:

  • Dementia care
  • Fire safety
  • First aid
  • Food hygiene
  • Health and safety
  • Infection control
  • Medication theory
  • Mental capacity and dolls
  • Moving and handling theory
  • Risk management
  • Safe guarding
  • Basic life support
  • Moving and handling people
  • Catheter and Conveen care
  • Stoma care
  • Pressure area care
  • Medication
  • Stocking care
  • Infection control
  • Gas and fire safety
  • Dementia training

 

What a carer can and can’t do:

Personal care

  • Washing, bathing and showering.
  • Dressing and undressing.
  • Cleaning teeth and dentures.
  • Shaving facial hair with an electric shaver.
  • Assisting with personal grooming; for example, brushing hair and applying makeup.
  • Toilet management and continence care, emptying and changing catheter bags but not resiting indwelling catheters.
  • Assisting with physical exercises to enable rehabilitation under the direction of a physiotherapist.

Day and night care

  • Companionship, social time with a client in or out of the house, walking or by car (planned).
  • Day sitting, being at a client’s home to provide personal and social care.
  • Night sitting, being awake to provide care during the night.
  • Night sleeping, sleeping at the client’s home and providing care if needed but not woken more than twice in a night (considered to be a waking night).

Moving

  • Moving and handling and use of lifting equipment, but not physically lifting a client without the correct equipment.

Medication

  • Medication collection and administering from prescribed and labelled containers.
  • Application of creams but not to broken skin, nor prescription creams without medical approval.
  • Monitoring blood sugar for diabetic clients but not injecting insulin.
  • Monitoring of weight and nutritional and fluid intake.

Household

  • Preparing meals, feeding and washing up.
  • Changing bed linen, laundry and ironing at the client’s home or at a laundrette.
  • Assisted shopping and help both to carry and put away items at a client’s home.
  • Shopping from a list and using client’s money to purchase items.

What a carer can’t do

  • Any of the roles above for anyone other than the client.
  • Household repairs or climbing ladders.
  • Duties that require a trained nurse. For example: changing dressings, giving injections.

At Radfield we have a mission: To be the best care company from whom to receive care and support, and to be the very best company for whom to work. We extend this mission with our Caring for Carers Pledge here…


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